Maintaining Your Wellbeing

We all have individual expectations when it comes to well being, and at the end of the day what works for you is probably exactly what you need, even if it might not be for everyone. So the key here is to make sure that whatever you are doing is effective and positive not only for yourself, but also works harmoniously with the needs of those close to you.

 

Whether you have found yourself in a period of crisis from unprecedented global or environmental conditions, changes in your professional career, rising conflict at home, or even have a healthy balance which for one reason or another feels like it is slipping away, there are many ways to personally manage your health and well being, which we explore below. 

1.

Be aware of your situation.

Your mental health is integral to your overall well being and must be taken seriously. If not, the ramifications can be lasting for not only your life, but the lives of those around you. So try to recognise and acknowledge your feelings regularly, and do not avoid the red flags.

2.

Maintain a healthy routine. 

We all know that to eat well is to live well, but in our busy schedules it is very easy to let this fall to the bottom of our priorities. The easiest way to counter this is to become reliant on your diary, and schedule in a recurring time to order your groceries online, do a bit of exercise, spend time with friends or family and of course, treat yourself! 

3.

Connect with others. 

Just because you might not be able to visit family or friends very often doesn't mean you are anti-social or letting them down. Get into the wide world of social media and stay connected with your networks. Simply 'liking' a photo or post is enough to let others know that you are still here and available if they ever wanted to reach out to you. 

4.

Confide in loved ones. 

You are not a jar of pickles, although keeping everything bottled up just might make you shriveled and sour. Talk to people you trust and express your feelings. Sometimes there are no resolutions and things are too out of our own control, but being able to get everything off your chest just might be the outlet you need. 

5.

Get moving. 

Try to incorporate movement into your daily routine. Just because you can't get out for a run or to go to that gym class does not mean you have to forgo all physical activity. Practice holding in different muscles when you sit, stand and walk. Treat general activities like a work out, such as stretching to reach items or brisk walking between tasks. Getting our heart beats up and keeping our bodies in a constant flow releases endorphins which makes us happier, healthier and ready for a good nights sleep. 

6.

Sleep. 

Long gone are the days that we fought with our parents to stay up just that little bit longer, in fact, you may be on the receiving end of that battle right now. So why do so many of us continue to protest against an early nights sleep? Is it because it makes us feel like adults? Are we exercising our freedoms? Or are we just too busy to get everything done before bedtime? The National Sleep Organisation recommends adults aged 18-64 get 7-9 hours of sleep each night, with the general rule that the hours of sleep before midnight are more valuable to the body than those acquired between midnight and morning. With all this in mind, maybe it might be best to take a leaf out of the books of many successful individuals who claim to rest early and rise early, swapping your evening tasks and night owl routines for something the early bird can do.  

Want to read more?

Being Prepared

Equipment and technology are not the only rapidly evolving workplace items. Think communities and even the 9-5.

Click to read

When it's Right

Deciding to revive or revise your career can be life changing, but don't underestimate the importance of timing.

Click to read

Purpose Driven

Understand a little more about our goals and how we can help in your search for a flexible employment solution. 

Click to read

Real Experiences

Read articles written about real life experiences professionals have had in their work environment. 

Click to read